Stores Are Safer With EAS Systems In Place

 

Retail Theft Prevention – 3                                                                                                      WC Blog 544
Checkpoint Systems – 5
Stop shoplifting -5
Stores Are Safer With Checkpoint Systems In Place
     Retail theft prevention should be part of a larger store security and safety strategy for your business. Stores that fail to take appropriate actions to prevent criminal activity from taking place put more than the store’s property, money and merchandise at risk. Owners and managers that fail to properly manage risk factors also endanger their employees and customers. In an article in Loss Prevention Media by Garrett Seivold, “A Security Lawsuit Is a Legal Landmine”, the author makes some excellent points regarding retail safety. Mr. Seivold references a convenience store robbery which had taken place in Rochester, New York. During the robbery, a Security Guard was shot in the face and suffers severe injuries today because of the shooting. The lawsuit included several complaints that led the jury to find the parent company of the convenience store responsible. The writer mentions the following factors which contributed to the jury decision:
In the ten years before the incident six shootings and 126 robberies had taken place at this store and others in the area
Money was not regularly transferred to a bank
Store employees had access to the safe rather than the use of a drop box accessible only to armed security personnel
“The parking lot was too dark.”
The defendant responded to these points but according to the article, in the end the jury awarded approximately 1.2 million dollars to the plaintiff. The lesson to store owners is that you have to show you are taking active measures to protect your staff and your customers. One way to do this is to take steps to stop shoplifting with Checkpoint Systems. 
     I know there are some of you who are wondering how you increase safety and security in a store with the installation of Checkpoint Systems. Other readers may not even know what the systems are and so I will briefly explain it before I move on. Checkpoint Systems are retail anti-theft devices that stop shoplifting through deterrence and theft detection. Systems are comprised of towers, tags and detachment tools or deactivation pads. The towers are placed near the exits of a building and can detect security tags on merchandise. Regardless of whether tagged merchandise is in the open or concealed the towers can pick up the radio frequency waves sent out from the tags. When a security tag is within a certain distance of the tower an alarm is activated and employees respond. Trained responders check receipts and manage a situation which usually results in a would-be shoplifter returning products or purchasing the items. The detachment tools and deactivation pads are the parts of Checkpoint Systems that remove hard tags or “turn off” soft electronic article surveillance tags at the points of sale. This prevents a legitimate customer from inadvertently causing a false alarm at the towers.
     I want to get back to the part where efforts to stop shoplifting are relevant to maintaining a safe and secure retail business. In stores where shoplifting is rampant it is not unusual to find other criminal activity taking place also. For example in the 2013 National Retail Federation’s Organized Retail Crime Survey they report on page 12, “…more companies this year report that the level of violence has grown in the past three years, both on the intimidation of sales associates and those who attempt to apprehend boosters.” They go on to say, “according to the survey, approximately two in 10 (18.3%) apprehensions now lead to some sort of violence…” There also appears to be an increase in the number of shoplifting cases related to the opioid crisis. When stores incorporate retail theft prevention steps to stop shoplifting the associated criminal activity also dries up.
     As seen in the case I referenced at the beginning of the article there are numerous areas that should be reviewed in a safety and security plan. Exterior lighting of the building and parking lots should be a top priority. Cash handling procedures should be reviewed. How are cash drops handled and are bank deposits regularly made? Guidelines need to be established for the maximum amount of funds held in a store and in cash registers. Associates should be limited in how much money they have access to. These suggestions only scratch the surface and should be part of a comprehensive security plan.
     Loss Prevention Systems Inc. can help you with a retail theft prevention program starting with Checkpoint Systems to stop shoplifting. Remove that criminal element and you will take a leap in the right direction of eliminating other crime in your area. As the bad guys begin to move out your environment will begin to become safer for your customers and employees. THAT will also help to increase your sales and improve your profit line.
Retail theft prevention is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

Retail theft prevention should be part of a larger store security and safety strategy for your business. Stores that fail to take appropriate actions to prevent criminal activity from taking place put more than the store’s property, money and merchandise at risk. Owners and managers that fail to properly manage risk factors also endanger their employees and customers. In an article in Loss Prevention Media by Garrett Seivold, “A Security Lawsuit Is a Legal Landmine”, the author makes some excellent points regarding retail safety. Mr. Seivold references a convenience store robbery which had taken place in Rochester, New York. During the robbery, a Security Guard was shot in the face and suffers severe injuries today because of the shooting. The lawsuit included several complaints that led the jury to find the parent company of the convenience store responsible. The writer mentions the following factors which contributed to the jury decision:

In the ten years before the incident six shootings and 126 robberies had taken place at this store and others in the area

Money was not regularly transferred to a bank

Store employees had access to the safe rather than the use of a drop box accessible only to armed security personnel

“The parking lot was too dark.

”The defendant responded to these points but according to the article, in the end the jury awarded approximately 1.2 million dollars to the plaintiff. The lesson to store owners is that you have to show you are taking active measures to protect your staff and your customers. One way to do this is to take steps to stop shoplifting with electronice article surveillance (EAS) systems. 

I know there are some of you who are wondering how you increase safety and security in a store with the installation of EAS systems. Other readers may not even know what the systems are and so I will briefly explain it before I move on. EAS systems are retail anti-theft devices that stop shoplifting through deterrence and theft detection. Systems are comprised of towers, tags and detachment tools or deactivation pads. The towers are placed near the exits of a building and can detect security tags on merchandise. Regardless of whether tagged merchandise is in the open or concealed the towers can pick up the radio frequency waves sent out from the tags. When a security tag is within a certain distance of the tower an alarm is activated and employees respond. Trained responders check receipts and manage a situation which usually results in a would-be shoplifter returning products or purchasing the items. The detachment tools and deactivation pads are the parts of EAS systems that remove hard tags or “turn off” soft electronic article surveillance tags at the points of sale. This prevents a legitimate customer from inadvertently causing a false alarm at the towers.

I want to get back to the part where efforts to stop shoplifting are relevant to maintaining a safe and secure retail business. In stores where shoplifting is rampant it is not unusual to find other criminal activity taking place also. For example in the 2013 National Retail Federation’s Organized Retail Crime Survey they report on page 12, “…more companies this year report that the level of violence has grown in the past three years, both on the intimidation of sales associates and those who attempt to apprehend boosters.” They go on to say, “according to the survey, approximately two in 10 (18.3%) apprehensions now lead to some sort of violence…” There also appears to be an increase in the number of shoplifting cases related to the opioid crisis. When stores incorporate retail theft prevention steps to stop shoplifting the associated criminal activity also dries up.

As seen in the case I referenced at the beginning of the article there are numerous areas that should be reviewed in a safety and security plan. Exterior lighting of the building and parking lots should be a top priority. Cash handling procedures should be reviewed. How are cash drops handled and are bank deposits regularly made? Guidelines need to be established for the maximum amount of funds held in a store and in cash registers. Associates should be limited in how much money they have access to. These suggestions only scratch the surface and should be part of a comprehensive security plan.

Loss Prevention Systems Inc. can help you with a retail theft prevention program starting with EAS systems to stop shoplifting. Remove that criminal element and you will take a leap in the right direction of eliminating other crime in your area. As the bad guys begin to move out your environment will begin to become safer for your customers and employees. THAT will also help to increase your sales and improve your profit line.

 

Retail theft prevention is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.