What Should Retail Workers Be Expected To Do To Stop Shoplifting? Part 2


          Sensormatic Hard Tags – 3                                                                              WC blog 747
          Stop Shoplifting – 4

What Should Retail Workers Be Expected To Do To Stop Shoplifting? Part 2

     I began this series relating a discussion I had with my son about what his role should be in order to stop shoplifting at his new job since he is only a sales associate. It came about I had asked him if he had any encounters with potential thieves as he works in the shoe department of this clothing chain. After telling me about a suspicious incident in which a customer may have stolen an expensive pair of shoes I told him what he can do in the future to help prevent a similar occurrence. I continued the article mentioning that in my former role as a Loss Prevention Manager for over 11 years I trained employees on how to place electronic article surveillance tags like the Sensormatic hard tags. I also trained employee on how to respond properly to electronic article surveillance alarms. My duties also included investigating employee theft cases and apprehending shoplifters. My general tip to my son and other retail employees is they should not be expected to be experts in identifying a shoplifter. They should however have a sense of when someone is suspicious and indicators to look for that would suggest it would be a good idea to notify a manager or Loss Prevention. They should also be ensuring that if the store uses electronic article surveillance devices they have an obligation to ensure merchandise is properly protected.

     Identifying suspicious people is not always easy to do. Sometimes there are behaviors that are suspicious and other times it may be the attire someone is wearing that may be suspicious. What is never acceptable and I warned my Loss Prevention Associates about NOT doing this is to base a suspicion on physical characteristics such as age or race. In my training I would use the following as tips for employees to determine if a shopper might be suspicious and help stop shoplifting:
Unseasonable clothing. If a person is wearing a heavy coat and the temperature outside does not warrant it that person should be given extra customer service.
Carrying a Large tote or handbag into the store that appears to be empty. Give that shopper a bit of extra attention and if the bag starts to appear fuller as they shop, become even more helpful.
When a person enters the store with a ball cap pulled down low and especially if wearing sunglasses into the store and not removing them, give extra attention to that person. They are probably trying to conceal their face from cameras.
This one is going to seem contrary to what a shoplifter would do but it was part of my talk with my son. If a customer seems TOO chatty and not about the products you are showing them, be suspicious. Sometimes it is a method used by thieves to try to gain the trust of an employee and I have even had a Loss Prevention officer of mine fooled by this tactic.
There is also the shopper who is quick to avoid ANY interaction with an associate. They don’t want any help, they stand in corners and out of the main traffic areas and they look around more than they look at the merchandise. They might be trying to find a way to remove Sensormatic hard tags or other anti-theft devices.
These are just a few tips from my experiences and training I received and provided. I would like to point out that at no time do I tell you that you or your staff should accuse or even suggest someone is trying to steal. Every customer should be greeted in a warm and welcoming manner and offered assistance, it is the right thing to do and it will improve sales. If any of the situations above take place then EXTRA customer service should be offered to stop shoplifting. Spend more time around the customer, engage them in conversation and give them little opportunity to conceal anything. Always be pleasant. The shoplifters tend to get vocal and start to make accusations of harassment but you can always fall back to the fact that you were strictly providing customer service. 

     These are a few suggestions to get you started but this is not all encompassing. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. has more information on Sensormatic hard tags and security systems and how they can improve sales and profit. They also have training opportunities on how to prevent shoplifting and even employee theft. There are blogs, newsletters and videos filled with informative tips and tricks to help you improve and grow your business. You and your employees can stop shoplifting without ever placing anyone in a position of having to accuse a person of trying to steal and that keeps everyone safe.
For more information about how to stop shoplifting contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

I began this series relating a discussion I had with my son about what his role should be in order to stop shoplifting at his new job since he is only a sales associate. It came about I had asked him if he had any encounters with potential thieves as he works in the shoe department of this clothing chain. After telling me about a suspicious incident in which a customer may have stolen an expensive pair of shoes I told him what he can do in the future to help prevent a similar occurrence. I continued the article mentioning that in my former role as a Loss Prevention Manager for over 11 years I trained employees on how to place electronic article surveillance tags like the Sensormatic hard tags. I also trained employee on how to respond properly to electronic article surveillance alarms. My duties also included investigating employee theft cases and apprehending shoplifters. My general tip to my son and other retail employees is they should not be expected to be experts in identifying a shoplifter. They should however have a sense of when someone is suspicious and indicators to look for that would suggest it would be a good idea to notify a manager or Loss Prevention. They should also be ensuring that if the store uses electronic article surveillance devices they have an obligation to ensure merchandise is properly protected.
     

Identifying suspicious people is not always easy to do. Sometimes there are behaviors that are suspicious and other times it may be the attire someone is wearing that may be suspicious. What is never acceptable and I warned my Loss Prevention Associates about NOT doing this is to base a suspicion on physical characteristics such as age or race. In my training I would use the following as tips for employees to determine if a shopper might be suspicious and help stop shoplifting:

Unseasonable clothing. If a person is wearing a heavy coat and the temperature outside does not warrant it that person should be given extra customer service.

Carrying a Large tote or handbag into the store that appears to be empty. Give that shopper a bit of extra attention and if the bag starts to appear fuller as they shop, become even more helpful.

When a person enters the store with a ball cap pulled down low and especially if wearing sunglasses into the store and not removing them, give extra attention to that person. They are probably trying to conceal their face from cameras.

This one is going to seem contrary to what a shoplifter would do but it was part of my talk with my son. If a customer seems TOO chatty and not about the products you are showing them, be suspicious. Sometimes it is a method used by thieves to try to gain the trust of an employee and I have even had a Loss Prevention officer of mine fooled by this tactic.

There is also the shopper who is quick to avoid ANY interaction with an associate. They don’t want any help, they stand in corners and out of the main traffic areas and they look around more than they look at the merchandise. They might be trying to find a way to remove Sensormatic hard tags or other anti-theft devices.

These are just a few tips from my experiences and training I received and provided. I would like to point out that at no time do I tell you that you or your staff should accuse or even suggest someone is trying to steal. Every customer should be greeted in a warm and welcoming manner and offered assistance, it is the right thing to do and it will improve sales. If any of the situations above take place then EXTRA customer service should be offered to stop shoplifting. Spend more time around the customer, engage them in conversation and give them little opportunity to conceal anything. Always be pleasant. The shoplifters tend to get vocal and start to make accusations of harassment but you can always fall back to the fact that you were strictly providing customer service. 
     

These are a few suggestions to get you started but this is not all encompassing. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. has more information on Sensormatic hard tags and security systems and how they can improve sales and profit. They also have training opportunities on how to prevent shoplifting and even employee theft. There are blogs, newsletters and videos filled with informative tips and tricks to help you improve and grow your business. You and your employees can stop shoplifting without ever placing anyone in a position of having to accuse a person of trying to steal and that keeps everyone safe.

 

For more information about how to stop shoplifting contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

 

What Should Retail Workers Be Expected To Do To Stop Shoplifting? Part 1

 

Stop Shoplifting -5                                                                                                                      WC Blog 746
Sensormatic Hard Tags -3
What Should Retail Workers Be Expected To Do To Stop Shoplifting? Part 1
     Is everyone in your store prepared to stop shoplifting? Do they know what signs to look for that may tip them off that someone may try to steal? I was talking with my son who recently started working for a nationally known clothing retailer. He has been working in food retail for about 6 years but wanted to get try other areas and picked up this second job. He is assigned to the shoe department and so I was talking with him about whether he has encountered any theft incidents. He said he did have one occasion where he believes a theft took place and he didn’t realize it. He said he was busy straightening up his department and a man asked him about an expensive pair of shoes. My son said he noticed the customer was already wearing a pair like the ones he was inquiring about. My son went to the back wall and retrieved the size the customer was asking for and the customer “seemed friendly” and they talked for a few minutes and the patron left. A little later the department supervisor asked my son if he knew where the man had gone to, Loss Prevention suspected he had stolen the shoes. My son had no idea where the customer had gone and told them so. As we talked he said he must not be very good at identifying potential shoplifters. I asked if their store uses Sensormatic hard tags or other electronic article surveillance tags on the shoes to stop shoplifting and he said they do. I told him that the tags should set off the alarm system if the suspect hasn’t gotten hold of a detachment device that will work with their tags.
     This took me back to my days as a Loss Prevention Manager and I recalled the training I did with store employees. I spent time at orientations meeting with new staff members and teaching them some of the characteristics that help to identify crooks. I also reminded them they are not Loss Prevention and are not expected to nor did we want them to accuse anyone of trying to steal. I always stressed the importance of customer service and keeping Loss Prevention or management aware of suspicious persons. I also made sure my training for cashiers and front end supervisors included how to properly respond to electronic article surveillance alarms. If done properly a response to an alarm would result in recovered merchandise and a safe interaction. An improper response was another issue. The take away is that no one was expected to be a Loss Prevention professional. That was the job for my team and me. 
     I reminded my son that his job was to ensure that shoes were properly tagged with Sensormatic hard tags or whatever devices that store uses before a customer could get access to them. The other expectations were to offer great service and if he was suspicious of someone to contact Loss Prevention. I did give him some hints about what to look for that would make it easier for him to know when to contact his Loss Prevention Department.
     But how about you and your team? You probably do not have a Loss Prevention Department. Who trains you and your employees on how to stop shoplifting? Do you have a Sensormatic security system in your store? If you don’t are you aware of how much you could save in shortage reduction with the installation of a system? Would you know what may indicate someone is a shoplifter versus a shopper? We haven’t even touched on the problem of identifying dishonest employees and their impact on your store shortage. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) is your go-to source for information on everything from Sensormatic hard tags and electronic article surveillance towers to training to stop shoplifting and employee theft. This is a company that has been in business since 1983 specializing in theft prevention and shortage reduction. Having conducted many Loss Prevention training sessions and worked in the field using retail anti-theft tools I have familiarized myself with LPSI’s offerings. I strongly urge retailers to consult with this company. They have all the resources usually available only to major retail chains (and more so in many cases).
     In Part 2 I will impart some of the advice I gave my son and training tips I used as a Loss Prevention Manager to instruct our store employees. What I can’t do is offer all of the resources to you that I have seen offered by LPSI. Read, Part 2, use it to help improve your efforts to stop shoplifting but also visit LPSI’s website. They can give so much more than I can in an article or two.
Sensormatic hard tags are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

Is everyone in your store prepared to stop shoplifting? Do they know what signs to look for that may tip them off that someone may try to steal? I was talking with my son who recently started working for a nationally known clothing retailer. He has been working in food retail for about 6 years but wanted to get try other areas and picked up this second job. He is assigned to the shoe department and so I was talking with him about whether he has encountered any theft incidents. He said he did have one occasion where he believes a theft took place and he didn’t realize it. He said he was busy straightening up his department and a man asked him about an expensive pair of shoes. My son said he noticed the customer was already wearing a pair like the ones he was inquiring about. My son went to the back wall and retrieved the size the customer was asking for and the customer “seemed friendly” and they talked for a few minutes and the patron left. A little later the department supervisor asked my son if he knew where the man had gone to, Loss Prevention suspected he had stolen the shoes. My son had no idea where the customer had gone and told them so. As we talked he said he must not be very good at identifying potential shoplifters. I asked if their store uses Sensormatic hard tags or other electronic article surveillance tags on the shoes to stop shoplifting and he said they do. I told him that the tags should set off the alarm system if the suspect hasn’t gotten hold of a detachment device that will work with their tags.

This took me back to my days as a Loss Prevention Manager and I recalled the training I did with store employees. I spent time at orientations meeting with new staff members and teaching them some of the characteristics that help to identify crooks. I also reminded them they are not Loss Prevention and are not expected to nor did we want them to accuse anyone of trying to steal. I always stressed the importance of customer service and keeping Loss Prevention or management aware of suspicious persons. I also made sure my training for cashiers and front end supervisors included how to properly respond to electronic article surveillance alarms. If done properly a response to an alarm would result in recovered merchandise and a safe interaction. An improper response was another issue. The take away is that no one was expected to be a Loss Prevention professional. That was the job for my team and me. 

I reminded my son that his job was to ensure that shoes were properly tagged with Sensormatic hard tags or whatever devices that store uses before a customer could get access to them. The other expectations were to offer great service and if he was suspicious of someone to contact Loss Prevention. I did give him some hints about what to look for that would make it easier for him to know when to contact his Loss Prevention Department.

But how about you and your team? You probably do not have a Loss Prevention Department. Who trains you and your employees on how to stop shoplifting? Do you have a Sensormatic security system in your store? If you don’t are you aware of how much you could save in shortage reduction with the installation of a system? Would you know what may indicate someone is a shoplifter versus a shopper? We haven’t even touched on the problem of identifying dishonest employees and their impact on your store shortage. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) is your go-to source for information on everything from Sensormatic hard tags and electronic article surveillance towers to training to stop shoplifting and employee theft. This is a company that has been in business since 1983 specializing in theft prevention and shortage reduction. Having conducted many Loss Prevention training sessions and worked in the field using retail anti-theft tools I have familiarized myself with LPSI’s offerings. I strongly urge retailers to consult with this company. They have all the resources usually available only to major retail chains (and more so in many cases).

In Part 2 I will impart some of the advice I gave my son and training tips I used as a Loss Prevention Manager to instruct our store employees. What I can’t do is offer all of the resources to you that I have seen offered by LPSI. Read, Part 2, use it to help improve your efforts to stop shoplifting but also visit LPSI’s website. They can give so much more than I can in an article or two.

 

Sensormatic hard tags are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

 

 

Sensormatic Flexible Safers??? What Are They And Why Would I Want Them?

Sensormatic Flexible Safers??? What Are They And Why Would I Want Them?

Sensormatic Safers are nothing new. Safers have been around for a long time. But, they have evolved! Basically you use a safer to protect goods that are not easily protected by alarming wraps, hard tags or a label. Sometimes very small merchandise items work well in a safer. High value items are another prospect for a safer.
So what is a Safer? In the traditional form a safer is a strong plastic box with a special locking device. It allows you to place merchandise items in it and still display them. Your customer can pick them up and take them up to the cashier who unlocks the box and rings up the merchandise. The safer is reused over and over. Safers can sit on a shelf or be hung from a peg hook. Safers come in hundreds of sizes. If a shoplifter attempts to steal merchandise inside a Flexible Safer, then the Sensormatic system at the customer doors goes into alarm.
Sensormatic has a new twist on the traditional safer with the Flexible Safer. This item has a secure, locking zipper type closure and is constructed out of heavy duty materials. It could not be torn open with your hands. It would require a tool of some sort to defeat. The Sensormatic Flexible Safer is not for every piece of merchandise. In many cases there are much better ways to secure products. 
However, the Flexible Safer can help solve certain problems with merchandise that cannot take a hard tag or label and must be displayed regardless. It gives us another tool to discourage shoplifting. I do not see this product being used on a wide scale basis but I do see it used for a specific, problem merchandise item.
Flexible Safers come in three sizes.  Small is ideal for SD Cards, Razor Blades, Cosmetics, Ear Buds, Batteries, Boxed Apparel and more. Height 208mm (8.19in) Width 200mm (7.87in).
Medium is best with Printer Ink Cartridges, Cosmetic Moisturizer, Baby Formula, Perfumes and similar sized items. Height 260mm (10.24in) Width 250mm (9.84in).
And lastly the large is perfect for HDMI Cables, Stereo Headphones, Game Controllers and Health & Beauty merchandise. Height 338mm (13.3in) Width 325mm (13.85in).
All Safers including the Flexible Safer are clear. Flexible Safers are available in both AM and RF technologies allowing you to open merchandise with confidence. They are very thin and will take up less room on your displays than a traditional safer. 
Flexible Safers are constructed from three clear, strong and lightweight plastics laminated together to form a strong, yet flexible, composite product. It is extremely easy to use and available in various magnetic strengths to work with the full line of Sensormatic magnetic detachers. They are reusable and will hold up in a busy retail environment.
The design is actually very pleasant to look at. In addition to being clear it has green and grey trim. I could easily see them on an endcap with higher dollar merchandise such as batteries or razor blades that a customer wants to compare without having to touch the merchandise. The customer can still pick them up, compare and select the item right for themselves without having staff nearby to help or unlock them.
Again, this is not a solve all for every piece of merchandise you carry. Like with any Sensormatic hard tag or label you need to have small quantities of several sizes to fit your needs.
Would you like a sample of Flexible Safers or ask questions? Please contact us by calling Loss Prevention Systems at 1-866-914-2567. We are ready to help you have a more profitable year.

Sensormatic Safers are nothing new. Safers have been around for a long time. But, they have evolved! Basically you use a safer to protect goods that are not easily protected by alarming wraps, hard tags or a label. Sometimes very small merchandise items work well in a safer. High value items are another prospect for a safer.

 

 So what is a Safer? In the traditional form a safer is a strong plastic box with a special locking device. It allows you to place merchandise items in it and still display them. Your customer can pick them up and take them up to the cashier who unlocks the box and rings up the merchandise. The safer is reused over and over. Safers can sit on a shelf or be hung from a peg hook. Safers come in hundreds of sizes. If a shoplifter attempts to steal merchandise inside a Flexible Safer, then the Sensormatic system at the customer doors goes into alarm.

 

Sensormatic has a new twist on the traditional safer with the Flexible Safer. This item has a secure, locking zipper type closure and is constructed out of heavy duty materials. It could not be torn open with your hands. It would require a tool of some sort to defeat. The Sensormatic Flexible Safer is not for every piece of merchandise. In many cases there are much better ways to secure products. 

 

However, the Flexible Safer can help solve certain problems with merchandise that cannot take a hard tag or label and must be displayed regardless. It gives us another tool to discourage shoplifting. I do not see this product being used on a wide scale basis but I do see it used for a specific, problem merchandise item.

 

Flexible Safers come in three sizes.  Small is ideal for SD Cards, Razor Blades, Cosmetics, Ear Buds, Batteries, Boxed Apparel and more. Height 208mm (8.19in) Width 200mm (7.87in).

 

Medium is best with Printer Ink Cartridges, Cosmetic Moisturizer, Baby Formula, Perfumes and similar sized items. Height 260mm (10.24in) Width 250mm (9.84in).

 

And lastly the large is perfect for HDMI Cables, Stereo Headphones, Game Controllers and Health & Beauty merchandise. Height 338mm (13.3in) Width 325mm (13.85in).

 

All Safers including the Flexible Safer are clear. Flexible Safers are available in both AM and RF technologies allowing you to open merchandise with confidence. They are very thin and will take up less room on your displays than a traditional safer. 

 

Flexible Safers are constructed from three clear, strong and lightweight plastics laminated together to form a strong, yet flexible, composite product. It is extremely easy to use and available in various magnetic strengths to work with the full line of Sensormatic magnetic detachers. They are reusable and will hold up in a busy retail environment.

 

The design is actually very pleasant to look at. In addition to being clear it has green and grey trim. I could easily see them on an endcap with higher dollar merchandise such as batteries or razor blades that a customer wants to compare without having to touch the merchandise. The customer can still pick them up, compare and select the item right for themselves without having staff nearby to help or unlock them.

 

Again, this is not a solve all for every piece of merchandise you carry. Like with any Sensormatic hard tag or label you need to have small quantities of several sizes to fit your needs.

 

Would you like a sample of Flexible Safers or ask questions? Please contact us by calling Loss Prevention Systems at 1-866-914-2567. We are ready to help you have a more profitable year.

 

Using Sensormatic Hard Tags

 

Using Sensormatic Hard Tags
Using your Sensormatic hard tags to stop apparel shoplifting is the clear and established way to attack the scourge of shoplifting. But many Retailers believe that one size fits all. Not true. You may find that you need a selection of several types of Sensormatic hard tags instead of just one. 
The same tag you would place on a heavy coat is not necessarily a good choice for swimwear or lingerie and visa-versa. Sensormatic hard tags that are designed for lighter fabrics may not have the ability to be placed on heavier fabrics. 
Another consideration is Sensormatic tag placement. It is important that your store places hard tags in consistent locations. This is critical for staff at the cash/wrap. A Cashier that has to search for a tag will slow down the customer experience and may result in a Sensormatic security tag being missed. This will lead to an alarm at the exit and a customer that is less than happy. To avoid this, tag in a consistent location known to all. For example, you may decide to tag all shirts on the rear seam of shirts below the collar. This is not only an easy location but it is also out of the customer’s way when they are trying on the shirt. On jeans you may want to place Sensormatic security tags on the outside seam of the right leg. It could be at knee level or at the ankle always on the right leg vs left. Sensormatic tags should always be placed with the tag on the outside of the garment with the pin on the inside. Again, this will help Cashiers quickly locate a Sensormatic tag.
Pins are another item that you may want in several types;  longer pins may be needed for thick fabric. But that same pin used on a thin fabric may result in the pin not fully seating in the Sensormatic tag. Some pins have serrated shafts to allow the Sensormatic tag clutch to more securely hold the pin. However, serrated pins are not a good choice for delicate fabrics as they may snag, ruining the merchandise.
The length of the pin is only one consideration. The head of the pin is also something you should pay attention to. Most pins are about half the size of a dime. This could allow a thief to simply stretch the fabric of a swimsuit over the pin with little or no damage. We have pins that have large heads that are about the size of a silver dollar. This type of pin is usually matched to a specific Sensormatic security tag.
There is also a choice with magnetic Sensormatic hard tags. This one is clutch strength. There are two overall choices. 5kG (standard) or 9kG (super). We strongly recommend that you only use 9kG hard tags. The clutch strength is very hard to defeat by a shoplifter. 5kG tags which will look identical are easily defeated by shoplifters with easily obtained and concealable tools. Many Sensormatic security tags come in both strengths. 
There is another choice in magnetic hard tag clutches. That is “S3” or the Commander detacher. This takes the clutch up even another notch. Loss Prevention Systems carries this line and it is extremely hard to defeat. Hard tags are available in both AM and RF versions.
One more area of Sensormatic hard tags worth mentioning are the alarming tags. These Sensormatic tags have a sounder built into the tag itself. If a shoplifter attempts to remove the hard tag, the built-in sounder goes into alarm. These are available in both 2-tone and 3-tone models. Both models will cause the Sensormatic system at the customer exit to go into alarm. However, the built-in sounder in the 3 tone will also go into alarm when the Sensormatic system does. This makes it very easy for the Retailer to locate the stolen merchandise, if it is hidden on the shoplifter.
Get more information on Sensormatic hard tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

Using your Sensormatic hard tags to stop apparel shoplifting is the clear and established way to attack the scourge of shoplifting. But many Retailers believe that one size fits all. Not true. You may find that you need a selection of several types of Sensormatic hard tags instead of just one. 

 

The same tag you would place on a heavy coat is not necessarily a good choice for swimwear or lingerie and visa-versa. Sensormatic hard tags that are designed for lighter fabrics may not have the ability to be placed on heavier fabrics. 

 

Another consideration is Sensormatic tag placement. It is important that your store places hard tags in consistent locations. This is critical for staff at the cash/wrap. A Cashier that has to search for a tag will slow down the customer experience and may result in a Sensormatic security tag being missed. This will lead to an alarm at the exit and a customer that is less than happy. To avoid this, tag in a consistent location known to all. For example, you may decide to tag all shirts on the rear seam of shirts below the collar. This is not only an easy location but it is also out of the customer’s way when they are trying on the shirt. On jeans you may want to place Sensormatic security tags on the outside seam of the right leg. It could be at knee level or at the ankle always on the right leg vs left. Sensormatic tags should always be placed with the tag on the outside of the garment with the pin on the inside. Again, this will help Cashiers quickly locate a Sensormatic tag.

 

Pins are another item that you may want in several types;  longer pins may be needed for thick fabric. But that same pin used on a thin fabric may result in the pin not fully seating in the Sensormatic tag. Some pins have serrated shafts to allow the Sensormatic tag clutch to more securely hold the pin. However, serrated pins are not a good choice for delicate fabrics as they may snag, ruining the merchandise.

 

The length of the pin is only one consideration. The head of the pin is also something you should pay attention to. Most pins are about half the size of a dime. This could allow a thief to simply stretch the fabric of a swimsuit over the pin with little or no damage. We have pins that have large heads that are about the size of a silver dollar. This type of pin is usually matched to a specific Sensormatic security tag.

 

There is also a choice with magnetic Sensormatic hard tags. This one is clutch strength. There are two overall choices. 5kG (standard) or 9kG (super). We strongly recommend that you only use 9kG hard tags. The clutch strength is very hard to defeat by a shoplifter. 5kG tags which will look identical are easily defeated by shoplifters with easily obtained and concealable tools. Many Sensormatic security tags come in both strengths. 

 

There is another choice in magnetic hard tag clutches. That is “S3” or the Commander detacher. This takes the clutch up even another notch. Loss Prevention Systems carries this line and it is extremely hard to defeat. Hard tags are available in both AM and RF versions.

 

One more area of Sensormatic hard tags worth mentioning are the alarming tags. These Sensormatic tags have a sounder built into the tag itself. If a shoplifter attempts to remove the hard tag, the built-in sounder goes into alarm. These are available in both 2-tone and 3-tone models. Both models will cause the Sensormatic system at the customer exit to go into alarm. However, the built-in sounder in the 3 tone will also go into alarm when the Sensormatic system does. This makes it very easy for the Retailer to locate the stolen merchandise, if it is hidden on the shoplifter.

 

Get more information on Sensormatic hard tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

 

 

Sensormatic Tags Provide Plenty Of Protection


Electronic Article Surveillance -3                                                                                                  WC Blog 723
Stop Shoplifting-3
Sensormatic Tags-3


Sensormatic Tags Provide Plenty Of Protection

     It’s been a while since I went on a rant about the mechanisms retailers put in place to stop shoplifting that drive me up the wall. After my shopping trip to a store to purchase a computer monitor because mine went kaput I got annoyed. This store puts security wraps around $80 routers and even some landline telephone systems but on an open shelf they had a computer monitor that was on sale normally priced around $119. There were no Sensormatic tags or other protection on it to prevent someone from picking it up and walking out the doors with it. Are You KIDDING ME? This same company has jump drives in security boxes. Good Grief! With the price points of some of the items that are protected with anti-theft devices to stop shoplifting it makes no sense to me that a computer monitor that WOULD be a target for shoplifters would be left unprotected.

     This isn’t my only rant on merchandise protection in stores. It wasn’t long ago that I was in another retail store that carries infant formula. This store was securing the baby formula cans in a type of security box device that appeared designed specifically for the formula cans in much the same way as Sesnormatic Magnetic Infant Formula Tags are designed to protect baby formula and similarly shaped cans. The protection of the cans is a great idea but what I found silly was the baby formula was then placed behind a security display that restricts the cans to being removed one at a time. I know why they are doing this. Baby formula is a high theft item for Organized Retail Crime groups. These are groups of professional shoplifting rings that are adept at stealing large quantities of merchandise and reselling them to mom and pop shops and through the internet. The thing that drives me crazy is the electronic article surveillance devices are supposed to be the deterrent to theft while making merchandise more accessible to the shoppers. Trust the tags, they work.

      Even Bill Bregar the CEO of Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. a former National Director of Loss Prevention recognizes that Sensormatic Tags and other retail anti-theft devices provide protection AND improve sales for stores. Use of electronic article surveillance systems gives retailers the ability to make merchandise more available to customers. Customers are more apt to purchase something they can pick up and carry rather than having to wait for assistance at a showcase. They also don’t like to feel restricted when they want more than one item from a shelf. Trusting in the Sensormatic system to do what it is intended to do improves sales and decreases shortage. Doubling security in my opinion only negates the purpose of using anti-shoplifting devices by impeding sales not enhancing them.

     Another rant I have involves security display cases and this directly impacts me because I work in a store that uses these monstrosities. Our store uses a new style of lock-up case that requires an electronic key to open. Now I already hate display cases because of how they are NOT customer friendly. The type our store uses are not employee or customer friendly. The key is held next to a place on the door and when the button on the key is held down a metal door pin is retracted and the door can be opened. The problem is the key has to be “recharged” or it does not retract the pin or the key works but the pin simply doesn’t respond. I have had to make customers wait for up to 10 minutes to get a key recharged (that is uncomfortable). Also when I went to look for my computer monitor another employee stopped me and asked if I knew how to make the key work because the managers were all busy and no one else was available to assist her. I showed her how to open the case and then I went shopping. If we just relied on Sensormatic tags and had enough employees on the floor we would avoid this issue.

      Electronic Article Surveillance can stop shoplifting and increase sales if it is managed properly. Not trusting a system once it is in place is counterproductive and results in lost sales as customers get annoyed at waiting. Invest in a Sensormatic security system and trust it to work in your favor. You will be happy with the results and you will stay off of my rant list.
Need information on Sensormatic tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

It’s been a while since I went on a rant about the mechanisms retailers put in place to stop shoplifting that drive me up the wall. After my shopping trip to a store to purchase a computer monitor because mine went kaput I got annoyed. This store puts security wraps around $80 routers and even some landline telephone systems but on an open shelf they had a computer monitor that was on sale normally priced around $119. There were no Sensormatic tags or other protection on it to prevent someone from picking it up and walking out the doors with it. Are You KIDDING ME? This same company has jump drives in security boxes. Good Grief! With the price points of some of the items that are protected with anti-theft devices to stop shoplifting it makes no sense to me that a computer monitor that WOULD be a target for shoplifters would be left unprotected.
     

This isn’t my only rant on merchandise protection in stores. It wasn’t long ago that I was in another retail store that carries infant formula. This store was securing the baby formula cans in a type of security box device that appeared designed specifically for the formula cans in much the same way as Sesnormatic Magnetic Infant Formula Tags are designed to protect baby formula and similarly shaped cans. The protection of the cans is a great idea but what I found silly was the baby formula was then placed behind a security display that restricts the cans to being removed one at a time. I know why they are doing this. Baby formula is a high theft item for Organized Retail Crime groups. These are groups of professional shoplifting rings that are adept at stealing large quantities of merchandise and reselling them to mom and pop shops and through the internet. The thing that drives me crazy is the electronic article surveillance devices are supposed to be the deterrent to theft while making merchandise more accessible to the shoppers. Trust the tags, they work.
     

Even Bill Bregar the CEO of Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. a former National Director of Loss Prevention recognizes that Sensormatic Tags and other retail anti-theft devices provide protection AND improve sales for stores. Use of electronic article surveillance systems gives retailers the ability to make merchandise more available to customers. Customers are more apt to purchase something they can pick up and carry rather than having to wait for assistance at a showcase. They also don’t like to feel restricted when they want more than one item from a shelf. Trusting in the Sensormatic system to do what it is intended to do improves sales and decreases shortage. Doubling security in my opinion only negates the purpose of using anti-shoplifting devices by impeding sales not enhancing them.
     

Another rant I have involves security display cases and this directly impacts me because I work in a store that uses these monstrosities. Our store uses a new style of lock-up case that requires an electronic key to open. Now I already hate display cases because of how they are NOT customer friendly. The type our store uses are not employee or customer friendly. The key is held next to a place on the door and when the button on the key is held down a metal door pin is retracted and the door can be opened. The problem is the key has to be “recharged” or it does not retract the pin or the key works but the pin simply doesn’t respond. I have had to make customers wait for up to 10 minutes to get a key recharged (that is uncomfortable). Also when I went to look for my computer monitor another employee stopped me and asked if I knew how to make the key work because the managers were all busy and no one else was available to assist her. I showed her how to open the case and then I went shopping. If we just relied on Sensormatic tags and had enough employees on the floor we would avoid this issue.
     

Electronic Article Surveillance can stop shoplifting and increase sales if it is managed properly. Not trusting a system once it is in place is counterproductive and results in lost sales as customers get annoyed at waiting. Invest in a Sensormatic security system and trust it to work in your favor. You will be happy with the results and you will stay off of my rant list.

 

Need information on Sensormatic tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

 

Combine Low Tech and High Tech Strategies To Stop Shoplifting

 

Stop Shoplifting – 4                                                                                                                   WC Blog 699
Sensormatic Security Tags -4
Combine Low Tech and High Tech Strategies To Stop Shoplifting
     Anytime I read an article about Loss Prevention techniques I am interested to see what the author has to say about how to stop shoplifting. Unfortunately I see few new ideas but for a store owner who has little background with shortage reduction it never hurts to be informed. It may be old hat for those of us in L.P. but we have to remember that the audiences reading the articles do not necessarily share our experiences. I recently reviewed an article that caused me to remember this as I read it. The author, Jennifer Goforth Gregory, writing in entrepeneur.com on May 27, 2015 in an article, “6 Low-Tech Ways to Reduce Shoplifting”, gives the following tips to business owners:
1. Put out the welcome mat – The message is to provide customer service and remove the anonymity shoplifters want.
2. Be a neatnick – The author points out that sloppy and untidy shelves/fixtures make it easy to hide signs of theft.
3. Let there be light – She points out that lighting removes the dark areas shoplifters prefer.
4. Plastic is your friend – Plastic shelf dividers placed on the front edge of the shelf can stop shoplifting by clearing products off a shelf in a single movement.
5. Have a secret code – This would be an intercom call that would be made to alert other employees of a suspicious person without identifying who that person is.
6. Keep a clear line of sight – place fixtures so there is a clear line of sight across the store.
All are great points and I disagree with none of them. The author’s point is, “…when it comes to preventing theft in your store, low-tech solutions can also be very effective.” I say kudos to the writer for pointing these tips out and I would tell every store owner to implement these suggestions. While it is not low-tech I would tell store owners that there is a technology that they can afford and that is the installation of an electronic article surveillance (EAS) system and the use of Sensormatic security tags to protect merchandise.
     Now you might be ready to stop reading but don’t do it! I know, you feel like you can’t afford to invest in a system and you may even be thinking your store is too small to benefit from one. You are wrong on both counts and a quick visit to the Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) website will show you why. The CEO of the company, Bill Bregar has been involved in theft prevention and investigations since his days as a corporate level director of Loss Prevention for several national retail chains. He knows how to stop shoplifting and internal theft and has built LPSI with the purpose of helping small and medium sized retailers with theft and shortage reduction. Whether it is conducting seminars on employee theft reduction training or advising on the right Sensormatic security tags to use on different merchandise, LPSI has solutions for every size store, even your small one. Affordability? Yes, you will even be surprised at how a system will save you money and pay for itself over time (tip: try out the free ROI calculator on the LPSI website).
     Low tech methods to prevent shoplifting should apply to every retailer. The same goes for higher tech methods. Great customer service for example should be the hallmark of EVERY retailer, I don’t care how big they are. It does prevent crime but it is also the right way to treat people who want to come in and look and shop. Reducing the number of hiding places and keeping the store visible even if it means setting up mirrors in corners and hard to see areas is a fairly easy problem to address. Tagging merchandise with Sensormatic security tags is a bit more time consuming but the payoff is a proven impact on shortage for stores, often by half of a percent or more. Combine all of the steps pointed out by Ms. Gregory in conjunction with the installation of an EAS system. I would also include a couple of closed circuit television cameras near the points of sale and the entry/exit doors and you have a very effective anti-theft strategy.
     Owning a small store does not mean you cannot afford theft prevention technology. Protecting merchandise with Sensormatic security tags and an EAS system will stop shoplifting and that improves profits. Make sure you do all of those low tech things and then contact LPSI about how you can also get your own Sensormatic security system.
Need information on a Sensormatic security system? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 today.

Anytime I read an article about Loss Prevention techniques I am interested to see what the author has to say about how to stop shoplifting. Unfortunately I see few new ideas but for a store owner who has little background with shortage reduction it never hurts to be informed. It may be old hat for those of us in L.P. but we have to remember that the audiences reading the articles do not necessarily share our experiences. I recently reviewed an article that caused me to remember this as I read it. The author, Jennifer Goforth Gregory, writing in entrepeneur.com on May 27, 2015 in an article, “6 Low-Tech Ways to Reduce Shoplifting”, gives the following tips to business owners:

1. Put out the welcome mat – The message is to provide customer service and remove the anonymity shoplifters want.

2. Be a neatnick – The author points out that sloppy and untidy shelves/fixtures make it easy to hide signs of theft.

3. Let there be light – She points out that lighting removes the dark areas shoplifters prefer.

4. Plastic is your friend – Plastic shelf dividers placed on the front edge of the shelf can stop shoplifting by clearing products off a shelf in a single movement.

5. Have a secret code – This would be an intercom call that would be made to alert other employees of a suspicious person without identifying who that person is.

6. Keep a clear line of sight – place fixtures so there is a clear line of sight across the store.

All are great points and I disagree with none of them. The author’s point is, “…when it comes to preventing theft in your store, low-tech solutions can also be very effective.” I say kudos to the writer for pointing these tips out and I would tell every store owner to implement these suggestions. While it is not low-tech I would tell store owners that there is a technology that they can afford and that is the installation of an electronic article surveillance (EAS) system and the use of Sensormatic security tags to protect merchandise.

Now you might be ready to stop reading but don’t do it! I know, you feel like you can’t afford to invest in a system and you may even be thinking your store is too small to benefit from one. You are wrong on both counts and a quick visit to the Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) website will show you why. The CEO of the company, Bill Bregar has been involved in theft prevention and investigations since his days as a corporate level director of Loss Prevention for several national retail chains. He knows how to stop shoplifting and internal theft and has built LPSI with the purpose of helping small and medium sized retailers with theft and shortage reduction. Whether it is conducting seminars on employee theft reduction training or advising on the right Sensormatic security tags to use on different merchandise, LPSI has solutions for every size store, even your small one. Affordability? Yes, you will even be surprised at how a system will save you money and pay for itself over time (tip: try out the free ROI calculator on the LPSI website).

Low tech methods to prevent shoplifting should apply to every retailer. The same goes for higher tech methods. Great customer service for example should be the hallmark of EVERY retailer, I don’t care how big they are. It does prevent crime but it is also the right way to treat people who want to come in and look and shop. Reducing the number of hiding places and keeping the store visible even if it means setting up mirrors in corners and hard to see areas is a fairly easy problem to address. Tagging merchandise with Sensormatic security tags is a bit more time consuming but the payoff is a proven impact on shortage for stores, often by half of a percent or more. Combine all of the steps pointed out by Ms. Gregory in conjunction with the installation of an EAS system. I would also include a couple of closed circuit television cameras near the points of sale and the entry/exit doors and you have a very effective anti-theft strategy.

Owning a small store does not mean you cannot afford theft prevention technology. Protecting merchandise with Sensormatic security tags and an EAS system will stop shoplifting and that improves profits. Make sure you do all of those low tech things and then contact LPSI about how you can also get your own Sensormatic security system.

 

Need information on a Sensormatic security system? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 today.

 

 

Prevent Shoplifting As Part Of A Strategy To Fill Shelves And Attract Shoppers Part 1

Prevent shoplifting-4                                                                                                                 WC Blog 516
Alpha Security-4
Retail anti-theft devices-3


Prevent Shoplifting As Part Of A Strategy To Fill Shelves And Attract Shoppers Part 1

     Brick and mortar stores are closing up at alarming rates and part of the issue is losses incurred due to failures to prevent shoplifting and return fraud.  I heard a radio news report just the other day reporting that Sears would be closing another 100 Sears and K-Mart stores in the coming months. There are people who will say that the closing of traditional stores is due to the changing buying habits of customers. People can order something simply by tapping their smartphone or clicking a few keyboard strokes and there you go your purchase is on the way, to you or to the person you want it sent to. Some people say that retailers aren’t adjusting their business models to keep up with changing times. I have my own thoughts on the situation. I shop a bit online but not nearly to the extent others do. I may purchase dvd’s (yeah, I know why do it when you can stream it? THAT is part of my pet peeves with today’s generation. I have a hard copy, I can watch when I want to. Your choices may not always be readily available on a streaming service) I have bought cd’s and I have made a book purchase or two. HOWEVER, when it comes to clothing, furniture and even most technology I prefer to buy in a store. I hear it now, the groans and moans of some readers who just think I am so passé and old fashioned. I’m just not hip, is it because my flip phone won’t allow me the ‘convenience’ of online shopping? Brick and mortar store owners, there is some responsibility on your part too to adapt. You HAVE to get customers to want to shop in your stores and you can’t afford to have thieves shoplifting and stealing profits. Bill Bregar and Loss Prevention Systems Inc. can help you with methods to prevent shoplifting including the use Alpha Security retail anti-theft devices on merchandise.

      If you own a store and are not using retail anti-theft devices to prevent shoplifting I am going to explain what you are missing out on. Alpha Security products are designed to use electronic article surveillance technology to sound an alarm if someone tries to remove a tagged device from a store. Relying on radio waves transmitted by anti-theft devices stores set up pedestals near the building entrances and exits that can pick up these radio waves. Tagged merchandise carried close to the pedestals initiates an alarm that blares across a store. Lights also flash and attract attention to the pedestals as a security tagged item is carried too close. Alarms sounding and lights flashing are not exactly the ideal situation for shoplifters and the majority of the time merchandise is dropped at the doors or a responding employee conducts a receipt check and recovers the merchandise. When products are not stolen they are available for customers to buy and that increases sales not to mention reduces shortage. The truth of the matter is a customer comes to a store to find something to purchase and bare shelves is a sure way to drive them away. Loss Prevention Systems Inc. has the Alpha Security products you need to keep merchandise from being stolen and ready to sell.

     If you aren’t convinced that a lack of merchandise will lead to lost customers I would remind readers to look at some of the traditional big name stores that have struggled. In a Wall Street Journal article, “Retailers Rethink Inventory Strategies” by Paul Ziobro, June 27, 2016, the story discusses how many retailers are trying to reduce on hand inventory to increase profit but as the author writes, “But Destocking isn’t without risk. Bare shelves are a major annoyance to shoppers who take the time to go into stores to shop.” Quoting Rodney Sides, Vice Chairman of the retail practice at Deloitte LLP, “If I hold too much inventory out of the stores, then I look like I’m out of business.” Too little inventory can be the result of planned reductions but it can also be the result of theft and thus it is necessary to take appropriate steps to prevent shoplifting.

     Use Alpha Security retail anti-theft devices and keep shelves full for customers. While you are at it is there anything else you can do to bring in customers? Are you trying to reach out to the online shoppers as well as the walk-in customers like me? How do you keep things fresh and new? In part 2, I will discuss some things that can help in your efforts to attract more customers and increase sales while deterring shoplifters in the process.
Alpha Security is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.
    

Brick and mortar stores are closing up at alarming rates and part of the issue is losses incurred due to failures to prevent shoplifting and return fraud. I heard a radio news report just the other day reporting that Sears would be closing another 100 Sears and K-Mart stores in the coming months. There are people who will say that the closing of traditional stores is due to the changing buying habits of customers. People can order something simply by tapping their smartphone or clicking a few keyboard strokes and there you go your purchase is on the way, to you or to the person you want it sent to. Some people say that retailers aren’t adjusting their business models to keep up with changing times. I have my own thoughts on the situation. I shop a bit online but not nearly to the extent others do. I may purchase dvd’s (yeah, I know why do it when you can stream it? THAT is part of my pet peeves with today’s generation. I have a hard copy, I can watch when I want to. Your choices may not always be readily available on a streaming service) I have bought cd’s and I have made a book purchase or two. HOWEVER, when it comes to clothing, furniture and even most technology I prefer to buy in a store. I hear it now, the groans and moans of some readers who just think I am so passé and old fashioned. I’m just not hip, is it because my flip phone won’t allow me the ‘convenience’ of online shopping? Brick and mortar store owners, there is some responsibility on your part too to adapt. You HAVE to get customers to want to shop in your stores and you can’t afford to have thieves shoplifting and stealing profits. Bill Bregar and Loss Prevention Systems Inc. can help you with methods to prevent shoplifting including the use retail anti-theft devices on merchandise.
     

If you own a store and are not using retail anti-theft devices to prevent shoplifting I am going to explain what you are missing out on. Retail anti-theft devices are designed to use electronic article surveillance technology to sound an alarm if someone tries to remove a tagged device from a store. Relying on radio waves transmitted by anti-theft devices stores set up pedestals near the building entrances and exits that can pick up these radio waves. Tagged merchandise carried close to the pedestals initiates an alarm that blares across a store. Lights also flash and attract attention to the pedestals as a security tagged item is carried too close. Alarms sounding and lights flashing are not exactly the ideal situation for shoplifters and the majority of the time merchandise is dropped at the doors or a responding employee conducts a receipt check and recovers the merchandise. When products are not stolen they are available for customers to buy and that increases sales not to mention reduces shortage. The truth of the matter is a customer comes to a store to find something to purchase and bare shelves is a sure way to drive them away. Loss Prevention Systems Inc. has the retail anti-theft products you need to keep merchandise from being stolen and ready to sell.
     

If you aren’t convinced that a lack of merchandise will lead to lost customers I would remind readers to look at some of the traditional big name stores that have struggled. In a Wall Street Journal article, “Retailers Rethink Inventory Strategies” by Paul Ziobro, June 27, 2016, the story discusses how many retailers are trying to reduce on hand inventory to increase profit but as the author writes, “But Destocking isn’t without risk. Bare shelves are a major annoyance to shoppers who take the time to go into stores to shop.” Quoting Rodney Sides, Vice Chairman of the retail practice at Deloitte LLP, “If I hold too much inventory out of the stores, then I look like I’m out of business.” Too little inventory can be the result of planned reductions but it can also be the result of theft and thus it is necessary to take appropriate steps to prevent shoplifting.
     

Use retail anti-theft devices and keep shelves full for customers. While you are at it is there anything else you can do to bring in customers? Are you trying to reach out to the online shoppers as well as the walk-in customers like me? How do you keep things fresh and new? In part 2, I will discuss some things that can help in your efforts to attract more customers and increase sales while deterring shoplifters in the process.

 

Retail anti-theft devices are important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.    

Stores Are Safer With EAS Systems In Place

 

Retail Theft Prevention – 3                                                                                                      WC Blog 544
Checkpoint Systems – 5
Stop shoplifting -5
Stores Are Safer With Checkpoint Systems In Place
     Retail theft prevention should be part of a larger store security and safety strategy for your business. Stores that fail to take appropriate actions to prevent criminal activity from taking place put more than the store’s property, money and merchandise at risk. Owners and managers that fail to properly manage risk factors also endanger their employees and customers. In an article in Loss Prevention Media by Garrett Seivold, “A Security Lawsuit Is a Legal Landmine”, the author makes some excellent points regarding retail safety. Mr. Seivold references a convenience store robbery which had taken place in Rochester, New York. During the robbery, a Security Guard was shot in the face and suffers severe injuries today because of the shooting. The lawsuit included several complaints that led the jury to find the parent company of the convenience store responsible. The writer mentions the following factors which contributed to the jury decision:
In the ten years before the incident six shootings and 126 robberies had taken place at this store and others in the area
Money was not regularly transferred to a bank
Store employees had access to the safe rather than the use of a drop box accessible only to armed security personnel
“The parking lot was too dark.”
The defendant responded to these points but according to the article, in the end the jury awarded approximately 1.2 million dollars to the plaintiff. The lesson to store owners is that you have to show you are taking active measures to protect your staff and your customers. One way to do this is to take steps to stop shoplifting with Checkpoint Systems. 
     I know there are some of you who are wondering how you increase safety and security in a store with the installation of Checkpoint Systems. Other readers may not even know what the systems are and so I will briefly explain it before I move on. Checkpoint Systems are retail anti-theft devices that stop shoplifting through deterrence and theft detection. Systems are comprised of towers, tags and detachment tools or deactivation pads. The towers are placed near the exits of a building and can detect security tags on merchandise. Regardless of whether tagged merchandise is in the open or concealed the towers can pick up the radio frequency waves sent out from the tags. When a security tag is within a certain distance of the tower an alarm is activated and employees respond. Trained responders check receipts and manage a situation which usually results in a would-be shoplifter returning products or purchasing the items. The detachment tools and deactivation pads are the parts of Checkpoint Systems that remove hard tags or “turn off” soft electronic article surveillance tags at the points of sale. This prevents a legitimate customer from inadvertently causing a false alarm at the towers.
     I want to get back to the part where efforts to stop shoplifting are relevant to maintaining a safe and secure retail business. In stores where shoplifting is rampant it is not unusual to find other criminal activity taking place also. For example in the 2013 National Retail Federation’s Organized Retail Crime Survey they report on page 12, “…more companies this year report that the level of violence has grown in the past three years, both on the intimidation of sales associates and those who attempt to apprehend boosters.” They go on to say, “according to the survey, approximately two in 10 (18.3%) apprehensions now lead to some sort of violence…” There also appears to be an increase in the number of shoplifting cases related to the opioid crisis. When stores incorporate retail theft prevention steps to stop shoplifting the associated criminal activity also dries up.
     As seen in the case I referenced at the beginning of the article there are numerous areas that should be reviewed in a safety and security plan. Exterior lighting of the building and parking lots should be a top priority. Cash handling procedures should be reviewed. How are cash drops handled and are bank deposits regularly made? Guidelines need to be established for the maximum amount of funds held in a store and in cash registers. Associates should be limited in how much money they have access to. These suggestions only scratch the surface and should be part of a comprehensive security plan.
     Loss Prevention Systems Inc. can help you with a retail theft prevention program starting with Checkpoint Systems to stop shoplifting. Remove that criminal element and you will take a leap in the right direction of eliminating other crime in your area. As the bad guys begin to move out your environment will begin to become safer for your customers and employees. THAT will also help to increase your sales and improve your profit line.
Retail theft prevention is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

Retail theft prevention should be part of a larger store security and safety strategy for your business. Stores that fail to take appropriate actions to prevent criminal activity from taking place put more than the store’s property, money and merchandise at risk. Owners and managers that fail to properly manage risk factors also endanger their employees and customers. In an article in Loss Prevention Media by Garrett Seivold, “A Security Lawsuit Is a Legal Landmine”, the author makes some excellent points regarding retail safety. Mr. Seivold references a convenience store robbery which had taken place in Rochester, New York. During the robbery, a Security Guard was shot in the face and suffers severe injuries today because of the shooting. The lawsuit included several complaints that led the jury to find the parent company of the convenience store responsible. The writer mentions the following factors which contributed to the jury decision:

In the ten years before the incident six shootings and 126 robberies had taken place at this store and others in the area

Money was not regularly transferred to a bank

Store employees had access to the safe rather than the use of a drop box accessible only to armed security personnel

“The parking lot was too dark.

”The defendant responded to these points but according to the article, in the end the jury awarded approximately 1.2 million dollars to the plaintiff. The lesson to store owners is that you have to show you are taking active measures to protect your staff and your customers. One way to do this is to take steps to stop shoplifting with electronice article surveillance (EAS) systems. 

I know there are some of you who are wondering how you increase safety and security in a store with the installation of EAS systems. Other readers may not even know what the systems are and so I will briefly explain it before I move on. EAS systems are retail anti-theft devices that stop shoplifting through deterrence and theft detection. Systems are comprised of towers, tags and detachment tools or deactivation pads. The towers are placed near the exits of a building and can detect security tags on merchandise. Regardless of whether tagged merchandise is in the open or concealed the towers can pick up the radio frequency waves sent out from the tags. When a security tag is within a certain distance of the tower an alarm is activated and employees respond. Trained responders check receipts and manage a situation which usually results in a would-be shoplifter returning products or purchasing the items. The detachment tools and deactivation pads are the parts of EAS systems that remove hard tags or “turn off” soft electronic article surveillance tags at the points of sale. This prevents a legitimate customer from inadvertently causing a false alarm at the towers.

I want to get back to the part where efforts to stop shoplifting are relevant to maintaining a safe and secure retail business. In stores where shoplifting is rampant it is not unusual to find other criminal activity taking place also. For example in the 2013 National Retail Federation’s Organized Retail Crime Survey they report on page 12, “…more companies this year report that the level of violence has grown in the past three years, both on the intimidation of sales associates and those who attempt to apprehend boosters.” They go on to say, “according to the survey, approximately two in 10 (18.3%) apprehensions now lead to some sort of violence…” There also appears to be an increase in the number of shoplifting cases related to the opioid crisis. When stores incorporate retail theft prevention steps to stop shoplifting the associated criminal activity also dries up.

As seen in the case I referenced at the beginning of the article there are numerous areas that should be reviewed in a safety and security plan. Exterior lighting of the building and parking lots should be a top priority. Cash handling procedures should be reviewed. How are cash drops handled and are bank deposits regularly made? Guidelines need to be established for the maximum amount of funds held in a store and in cash registers. Associates should be limited in how much money they have access to. These suggestions only scratch the surface and should be part of a comprehensive security plan.

Loss Prevention Systems Inc. can help you with a retail theft prevention program starting with EAS systems to stop shoplifting. Remove that criminal element and you will take a leap in the right direction of eliminating other crime in your area. As the bad guys begin to move out your environment will begin to become safer for your customers and employees. THAT will also help to increase your sales and improve your profit line.

 

Retail theft prevention is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

 

 

DON’T LET THIEVES FLY AWAY WITH YOUR DRONES

 

DON’T LET THIEVES FLY AWAY WITH YOUR DRONES – USE AN ALPHA SPIDER WRAP
The drone business is set to be a multi-billion dollar a year industry and this shopping season should see sales take-off like never before. As with any hot new and exciting product, you have to Prevent Shoplifting if you want to keep yourself profitable. Whether you plan to stock the very best high-end camera platforms, or some inexpensive toys, these products are guaranteed to be a hit this year and can really add a significant amount to your bottom line. So, let’s talk strategy, shall we?
Last year around the holidays, my store purchased tons of drones. Small ones, big ones, cheap ones and expensive ones. They were an absolute hit and we sold them hand over fist. We also lost quite a bit to both internal and external theft. This was our first year really buying into the category, and we really dropped the ball in securing them. This year, we bought a few hundred Alpha Spider Wraps to get us through the season. Here’s why we made that decision this year and why you should consider it as well. 
With the drone category, you really have to give your customer’s access to the product. The open-sell concept is what really drives the business in this category. You can’t have the product behind a case, or a have just a display box on the shelf. You have to let the customer see the product, hold it in their hands, and yes, even let them play with it. (I set up a little indoor area for customers to play with some of the more popular ones. Great way to blow out of them). What I didn’t do was use an Alpha Spider Wrap in order to Prevent Shoplifting. 
Within the first week that we set our displays out, we had lost two. In another week, I had lost 10. By the time Black Friday rolled around, I was down nearly 25 units. I stationed an employee at the display center, but you know how it is during those busy days. There’s just no way that you can keep up with everyone. All told, I lost about 100 units last year. You can bet that my stores are not going to lose that much again this year. I’ve got my retail utility belt on and I’m primed and ready to Prevent Shoplifting. 
If you’re thinking about adding some cool new drones to your store’s holiday assortment this year, you’d be remiss if you didn’t at least consider the Alpha Spider Wrap. While I never expect any singular product to completely Prevent Shoplifting, I fully expect to see between 50-60% less theft than last year. Go ahead, give them a try. 
 
For more information about Alpha Tech contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

The drone business is set to be a multi-billion dollar a year industry. As with any hot and exciting product, you have to Prevent Shoplifting if you want to keep yourself profitable. Whether you plan to stock the very best high-end camera platforms, or some inexpensive toys, these products are guaranteed to be a hit this year and can really add a significant amount to your bottom line. So, let’s talk strategy, shall we?

 Last year around the holidays, my store purchased tons of drones. Small ones, big ones, cheap ones and expensive ones. They were an absolute hit and we sold them hand over fist. We also lost quite a bit to both internal and external theft. This was our first year really buying into the category, and we really dropped the ball in securing them. This year, we bought a few hundred wrap tags  to get us through the season. Here’s why we made that decision this year and why you should consider it as well. 

 With the drone category, you really have to give your customer’s access to the product. The open-sell concept is what really drives the business in this category. You can’t have the product behind a case, or a have just a display box on the shelf. You have to let the customer see the product, hold it in their hands, and yes, even let them play with it. (I set up a little indoor area for customers to play with some of the more popular ones. Great way to blow out of them). What I didn’t do was use an wrap tag in order to Prevent Shoplifting

 Within the first week that we set our displays out, we had lost two. In another week, I had lost 10. By the time Black Friday rolled around, I was down nearly 25 units. I stationed an employee at the display center, but you know how it is during those busy days. There’s just no way that you can keep up with everyone. All told, I lost about 100 units last year. You can bet that my stores are not going to lose that much again this year. I’ve got my retail utility belt on and I’m primed and ready to Prevent Shoplifting. 

 If you’re thinking about adding some cool new drones to your store’s holiday assortment this year, you’d be remiss if you didn’t at least consider the retail anti-theft devices. While I never expect any singular product to completely Prevent Shoplifting, I fully expect to see between 50-60% less theft than last year. Go ahead, give them a try. 

 
For more information about retail anti-theft devices, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.

 

Alpha spider wraps

An Alpha Bug Tag Deters Display Theft

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An Alpha Bug Tag Deters Display Theft

     How do you prevent shoplifting of your computer tablet, computer or laptop displays? I work in a store that sells all of the above and other merchandise as well. Our displays are secured with retail anti-theft devices but despite the security we are using we have had at least one theft of a high priced computer tablet that I am aware of. The display was attached to an alarmed wire that is connected to the tablets and computers but in the situation I am addressing the thief was not concerned with the system we are using. I wondered what other steps the company could take to prevent another such incident. The first thing that came to me was that the company could invest in an Alpha Bug Tag for each unit. 

     The Alpha Bug Tag is a retail anti-theft device that uses electronic article surveillance to deter and prevent shoplifting (and the theft of mobile devices used in retail and the medical field too). The tag attaches directly to the unit to be protected and should someone walk towards a doorway that has EAS towers while holding a protected item alarms sound and warning lights flash. The tag also has a tamper alarm that sounds when a criminal tries to pry a device off of a display or mobile device. The 3 Alarm version of the tag also has a self-alarm that is activated if a shoplifter exits the store with a device and chooses to ignore the EAS tower alarm. The third alarm capability means that the shoplifter can no longer melt into a crowd of people and become anonymous; everyone around them will know they have stolen items. While you shouldn’t chase a thief you can act on information provided by bystanders who will give you get away vehicle and license plate information.

     At our store the bad guy who stole our tablet display came into the building, looked around and knelt down by the tablet displays. When no one was in the area he grabbed the display, jerked it from the alarm wire and mounts and ran out the door. The only alarm that was heard was at the display and our suspect was gone. Had a 3 Alarm Alpha Bug Tag been used to supplement the anti-theft unit the tablet was mounted on the tag would have set off the EAS towers AND the Tag would have sounded an alarm while the suspect was running in the parking lot. The combination might have been enough to prevent shoplifting since the suspect may have dropped the merchandise when he realized the alarm was going with him. While a police report was filed and the District Loss Prevention Manager was notified of the incident to the best of my knowledge the suspect has never been captured.

      Looking for an alternative to using dual retail anti-theft devices to protect your displays? There is now an Alpha Bug Tag 2 Snare that can be used in with the Bug Tag 2 units. The snare allows the tag to be secured to a shelf and provides the same capability of traditional retail anti-theft fixtures permitting patrons to pick up and handle display products. The Tag retains the anti-tampering features and if one of the cables is cut an alarm is activated and employees are alerted to a theft taking place at the display.

     Displays in your store require as much attention of not more attention than the brand new merchandise. Shoplifters get an active display unit in their grasp and may be more inclined to try to get away with it because they are holding it. It’s sort of like a new car. It’s one thing to look at it shiny and new on the salesfloor but once you get in it and hold the wheel in your hand it becomes more difficult to resist. Give criminals a reason to resist the temptation to steal your displays. Use an Alpha Bug Tag on all of the items you display whether it is on a traditional display or using the tag and Snare combination.
Need information on Alpha Bug Tag? Contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 now.
     

How do you prevent shoplifting of your computer tablet, computer or laptop displays? I work in a store that sells all of the above and other merchandise as well. Our displays are secured with retail anti-theft devices but despite the security we are using we have had at least one theft of a high priced computer tablet that I am aware of. The display was attached to an alarmed wire that is connected to the tablets and computers but in the situation I am addressing the thief was not concerned with the system we are using. I wondered what other steps the company could take to prevent another such incident. The first thing that came to me was that the company could invest in an Alpha Bug Tag for each unit. 
     

The Alpha Bug Tag is a retail anti-theft device that uses electronic article surveillance to deter and prevent shoplifting (and the theft of mobile devices used in retail and the medical field too). The tag attaches directly to the unit to be protected and should someone walk towards a doorway that has EAS towers while holding a protected item alarms sound and warning lights flash. The tag also has a tamper alarm that sounds when a criminal tries to pry a device off of a display or mobile device. The 3 Alarm version of the tag also has a self-alarm that is activated if a shoplifter exits the store with a device and chooses to ignore the EAS tower alarm. The third alarm capability means that the shoplifter can no longer melt into a crowd of people and become anonymous; everyone around them will know they have stolen items. While you shouldn’t chase a thief you can act on information provided by bystanders who will give you get away vehicle and license plate information.
     

At our store the bad guy who stole our tablet display came into the building, looked around and knelt down by the tablet displays. When no one was in the area he grabbed the display, jerked it from the alarm wire and mounts and ran out the door. The only alarm that was heard was at the display and our suspect was gone. Had a 3 Alarm Alpha Bug Tag been used to supplement the anti-theft unit the tablet was mounted on the tag would have set off the EAS towers AND the Tag would have sounded an alarm while the suspect was running in the parking lot. The combination might have been enough to prevent shoplifting since the suspect may have dropped the merchandise when he realized the alarm was going with him. While a police report was filed and the District Loss Prevention Manager was notified of the incident to the best of my knowledge the suspect has never been captured.
     

Looking for an alternative to using dual retail anti-theft devices to protect your displays? There is now an Alpha Bug Tag 2 Snare that can be used in with the Bug Tag 2 units. The snare allows the tag to be secured to a shelf and provides the same capability of traditional retail anti-theft fixtures permitting patrons to pick up and handle display products. The Tag retains the anti-tampering features and if one of the cables is cut an alarm is activated and employees are alerted to a theft taking place at the display.
     

Displays in your store require as much attention of not more attention than the brand new merchandise. Shoplifters get an active display unit in their grasp and may be more inclined to try to get away with it because they are holding it. It’s sort of like a new car. It’s one thing to look at it shiny and new on the salesfloor but once you get in it and hold the wheel in your hand it becomes more difficult to resist. Give criminals a reason to resist the temptation to steal your displays. Use an Alpha Bug Tag on all of the items you display whether it is on a traditional display or using the tag and Snare combination.

 

Need information on Alpha Bug Tag? Contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 now.